Write and Shine

Writing advice doesn’t get better than Seymour’s note to brother Buddy in JD Salinger’s Seymour, An Introduction.

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I dread saying anything to you tonight, dear old Buddy, except the trite. Please follow your heart, win or lose. You got so mad at me when we were registering…. Do you know what I was smiling at? You wrote down that you were a writer by profession. It sounded to me like the loveliest euphemism I had ever heart. When was writing ever your profession? It’s never been anything but your religion. Never. I’m a little over-excited now. Since it is your religion, do you know what you will be asked when you die? But let me tell you first what you won’t be asked. You won’t be asked if you were working on a wonderful, moving piece of writing when you died. You won’t be asked if it was a long or short, sad or funny, published or unpublished. You won’t be asked if you were in good or bad form while you were working on it. You won’t even be asked if it was the one piece of writing you would have been working on if you had known your time would be up when it was finished – I think only poor Sören K. will get asked that. I’m so sure you’ll get asked only two questions. Were most of your stars out? Where you busy writing your heart out​? If only you knew how easy it would be for you to say yes to both questions. If only you’d remember before ever you sit down to write that you’ve been a reader long before you were ever a writer. You simply fix that fact in your mind, then sit very still and ask yourself, as a reader, what piece of writing in all the world Buddy Glass would most want to read if he had his heart’s choice. The next step is terrible, but so simple I can hardly believe it as I write it. You just sit down shamelessly and write the thing yourself. I won’t even underline that. It’s too important to be underlined. Oh, dare to do it, Buddy! Trust your heart. You’re a deserving craftsman. It would never betray you. Good night. I’m feeling very much over-excited now, and a little dramatic, but I think I’d give almost anything on earth to see you writing a something, an anything, a story, a poem, a tree, that was really and truly after your own heart… Love, S

Next time you sit down to write ask: Are all my stars out? Am I writing my heart out?

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Poem of the Month: O Me, O Life! by Walt Whitman

October flew – here I am on the 30th only just adding my poem of the month. Work. Moving. Family. Love. What good, amid these, o time taken to memorise poetry? Answer: that the enrichment outweighs the effort.

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Oh Me, O Life!  by Walt Whitman

Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring,

Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish,

Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?)

Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d,

Of the poor results of all, of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me,

Of the empty and useless years of the rest, with the rest me intertwined,

The question, O me! so sad, recurring – What good amid these, O me, O life?

Answer:

That you are here – that life exists and identity,

That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse

Share your favourite “city” poem in the comments.

Ibiza Writing Challenge

Blogging daily in August for my Ibiza Writing Challenge was incredibly rewarding.

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It was a pleasure to go through old photos, choose favourite quotes, and connect with new friends. Massive thanks to all of you who liked, followed and joined in the conversation and inspiration over the past month.

I’d like to do something special to thank everyone who’s read the blog over the past month, so I’ll put it to a vote. Would you like:

A) Another article in the ‘How To Be Creative’ series?
B) A downloadable PDF of the highlights of my ‘How to Write Non-Fiction’ series?
C) My Top 5 Writing Craft Guides as a PDF?

Please vote in the comments!